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Newsletters and eBlasts

A newsletter (or e-blast) is a structured form of correspondence to a bulk of email addresses. It can be a useful tool for you to communicate with your existing audience base. That base might be a mailing list you’ve accumulated from ticket buyers to past shows, or a core group of family/friends who support your work.

Introduction

Why a Newsletter?

Yes, it sounds obvious, but the best newsletters are the ones you send when you actually have something to say. Your average person receives a lot of newsletters to their inbox and doesn’t open most of them - so you want to give them a reason to spend time on yours.

That said, newsletters can also be a tool to stay in touch with your audience when you’re not currently active. Maybe you have a company that produces a show every 1-2 years, but you make a point of sending a quarterly newsletter just to stay on people’s radar and share some general updates. 

Make a Plan

Include newsletters in your marketing and communications plan for a project. Identify key points in the process at which it makes sense to send an email communication, and then make sure you leave yourself enough time to create it. If you’re producing a show, a sample schedule might look like this (where T = Opening Night):

T-3 months: Show announcement
T-2 months: Tickets on sale
T-1 month: Interview with the Director
T-2 weeks: Interview with the Playwright
T-1 week: The show opens in 1 week
T-1 day: Production photos
T+5 days: Reviews from critics and audiences / Last chance to see it 
T+3 weeks: Thanks for coming 

People have different opinions about what constitutes “too many” newsletters, but a good rule of thumb is no more than once a week , even when you’re in production mode. 

Audience Management

Make it easy to sign up

Most platforms will have easy ways for you to integrate a newsletter sign up on your Facebook page and website. Bottom line: make it easy for people to find.

Screenshot of Groundling Theatre Company’s Facebook page - there is a customized “sign up” button at the top of the page, and “Email signup” is one of the page tabs. 
Screenshot of Groundling Theatre Company’s Facebook page - there is a customized “sign up” button at the top of the page, and “Email signup” is one of the page tabs. 

 

When you are sending a newsletter in Canada, you are obligated to adhere to the Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation, or ‘CASL’ (castle!) for short. You can find basic information about CASL on the government’s website here and more detailed information about how these guidelines affect you as a sender here. You’ll note there are exceptions (you can email family, employees, and people with “an established personal relationship” as much as you want), but in general you need to make sure you have either implied consent or explicit consent for anyone you’re emailing a newsletter to:

Implied consent means that you are allowed to email anyone who has interacted with your organization in a transactional way for the 24 months following that encounter. Translation: if someone bought a ticket to your show, you’re allowed to email them for two years. (But of course, if they unsubscribe or ask to be removed from your mailing list, you must honour that.)

Explicit consent means that someone has specifically elected to receive communications from you. This may take the form of a ‘Sign up to our newsletter’ sheet at an event, a ‘yes’ answer to the question ‘Do you want to receive newsletters from us?’ on Brown Paper Tickets for ticket buyers, or signing up using an embedded form via your website or social media platforms. 

A website screenshot displays the text 'Subscribe to our newsletter Sign up with your email address to receive news about calls for submissions, training opportunities, things we're doing in the community and Generator's Artists in Action.' with a button that says 'SIGN UP' and social media icons for Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.
Screenshot from the footer on Generator’s website. People who sign up for the newsletter in this way would be considered to have provided “explicit consent.”


Newsletter platforms often have built-in tools to help you make sure you have the right consent. If you go to manually add a contact in Mailchimp, Mailchimp will ask you to check a box to confirm that “this person has given me permission to email them.” They also have a double opt-in option, which means that if someone signs up via e.g. your website, they would receive a confirmation email they need to click to double-confirm their desire to be on your list. 

Make sure you keep track of and/or separate emails you have implicit consent for (that will expire), and those you have explicit consent for. When your implied consent emails are set to expire, you should try to ‘convert’ them into explicit consent, by send them a final email asking them to take action to confirm their consent to receive communications from you.

An email screenshot displays the text 'Stay in touch with Discord and Din Theatre! Follow the link below to confirm your consent to receive emails from Discord and Din, the company that brought you Lela
Image: a sample email from Discord and Din Theatre sent to email addresses from ticket buyers whose implied consent was about to expire. 

 

Consider Segmenting Your Audience

Most platforms will have built-in tools to help you segment your audience (e.g. the ‘tags’ function in Mailchimp), but you can always manage your lists using an external tool such as Google Sheets or Microsoft Excel. You may want to segment your audience if you want to communicate information to different people at different times, or communicate/highlight different information altogether.

For instance, if you’re doing an end-of-year donation plea, you might want to make sure that doesn’t go to people who have donated to your company recently. You might even want to have a separate newsletter list for donors in order to send them specific communications. You might also consider create a media newsletter list if you’re sending out your own press releases. Or you might design a specific newsletter welcoming all those whose emails you collected from buying tickets to your most recent show, but you might not otherwise be well-acquainted with you or your work.

Make sure there's an option to “unsubscribe”

If you’re sending an email, always make sure there is an option to unsubscribe (ideally in the footer - you don’t want to make it so easy that you’re always losing people, you just want to give them the option if they go looking for it). 

Left: The footer is cut off, meaning email recipients have to navigate away from the message to find the unsubscribe option (not so good). Right: full footer appears, including an option to unsubscribe (good).
Left: The footer is cut off, meaning email recipients have to navigate away from the message to find the unsubscribe option (not so good). Right: full footer appears, including an option to unsubscribe (good).

 

Back up your mailing list

Export your mailing list from your newsletter platform regularly so that you have a back-up of all those emails - accidents happen, and they’re hard to get back. 

Building your Newsletter

Subject Lines

Remember that for most people, this newsletter is going right to their “promotions” folder, so give the subject line some thought. Be informative - what will people find inside - and enticing - so they’ll actually want to open it - and consistent with your brand/voice.

What Mailchimp says makes a good subject line:

  • It's short and sweet - Subject lines with fewer than 9 words tend to perform better
  • Emojis are great... in small quantities - we suggest using no more than 1.

...and we’ll add to that: hold back on caps lock or multiple exclamation points!

Beware Information Overload

Is anyone going to read the eighth paragraph in your newsletter? (Maybe, but...maybe not.) Check out some newsletters in your own inbox to give yourself a sense of what the right amount of content might be. In general it’s helpful to think of there being “lead content” (the reason you’re sending the newsletter in the first place), and 1-2 other sections. 

When to Send

Consider the time of day - is anyone really checking their email at 8pm on a Friday? 8am on a Sunday? You can start to learn about the times of day and days of the week that resonate with your audience by testing things out and comparing open rates. Mailchimp also has an option to ‘optimize send time’ if you want to let their algorithm take the wheel. 

Be aware of when other organizations are likely to send their newsletters (or similar newsletters). You may want to send a “Last Chance to Donate This Year” on December 31, but maybe sending it on December 27 means getting ahead of ten similar emails. Same thing applies for Giving Tuesday and anything else related to major holidays. 

Platforms

Mailchimp
MadMimi
Constant Contact

Created by awong. Last Modification: Wednesday April 8, 2020 15:47:43 EDT by aclarke.